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In times of crisis, UNESCO is present

In times of crisis, UNESCO is present

Mar 25, 2020 , Source: uneconews

In memory of Pilar Luna, Mexican underwater archeologist that left us on March 15, 2020

Pilar LUNA was a pioneer in the protection and management for underwater cultural heritage. As a woman of science from Latin America and the Caribbean, she inspired many more in the region to the point that gender parity is a reality in the field of underwater archaeology in this part of the world. Her enthusiasm and true passion to protect and preserve our common heritage under the waters of our planet, made many people, from the general public to the highest politicians, conscious of the need to be aware of this enormous rich resource of our past that is in need of active protection. The protection against natural degradation but also ignorance and greed was an important focus in her life. She lead the Center for Underwater Archeology of the INAH (Instituto Nacional de Arqueología e Historia) of Mexico during 37 years and even after her retirement, she continued to collaborate with INAH in a number of research and capacity building projects. In the global arena, Pilar an active member of the Mexican Delegation to the numerous consultations meetings at UNESCO that resulted in the creation of the 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage. Her support to the region continued in the ratification processes of this important instrument as well as helped establishing the necessary capacities and structures for its appropriate implementation. Pilar was a member of the Scientific Technical Advisory Body of the UNESCO Convention (STAB) and of the ICOMOS International Committee for Underwater Cultural Heritage (ICUCH). Today the region counts with twenty state parties to the 2001 Convention which make a strong and united force against treasure hunting, indifference or unethical exploitation of its underwater cultural heritage. She encouraged and organized many trainings and capacity building initiatives in her home country Mexico and elsewhere in the region, always ready to participate and brake any barriers to accomplish the goal of ensuring sustainable continuation of the work that she and many colleagues of her generation achieved. Thanks to Pilar LUNA many underwater archeologists, now working within their national institutions or in university programmes in the region, will ensure that her efforts continue. Although Pilar's desire to seize every moment of life was something she transmitted to anyone that had the fortune of working with her and learn from her, she also knew that every day on earth is a gift that could be taken away any minute. This probably was behind her eagerness to teach and leave a solid legacy. She contributed to a strong network of underwater archaeologists in Latin America and the Caribbean Region that work together, know what solidarity is and strive to make this profession flourish in our countries. Today, thanks to the work she started, the underwater archaeology of the Region is internationally recognized and present in scientific conferences and symposia. Pilar was also an unconditional friend, ready to listen and help anyone that reached out to her. Her generosity was also a great gift. She knew well that although our work is to understand humankind through its material world, we do not take it with us when we go. Her best gift to us was her knowledge, which is a torch she passed on to younger generations of underwater archaeologists and heritage managers to continue lighting up the way and to pass in on when their turn comes. Nevertheless, although all of us who knew her and worked with her are profoundly sad, there is a strong feeling of her presence as an inspiring force that pushes us to continue working for what she taught us to love and understand the most: our cultural heritage preserved in the depths of our Oceans, Seas, Rivers and Lakes. She acts already, beyond expectations, as a patron for underwater archeologists. May your voyage be happy and your sailing smooth.  
Mar 25, 2020 , Source: uneconews
A Group Of Young Moslawis Paint Neighborhood Blue to Emulate Chefchaouen

Youth-driven initiatives promotes safe learning environment for girls in Tanzanian schools

At Ngweli Secondary School in Sengerema district of Tanzania, safe space-TUSEME (“Let’s speak out” in Swahili) youth club members are running a school cafeteria. ‘It was for us to have safe food’, shared student leader Said Ramadhan Rashid. When the school did not have a cafeteria, students used to go out to find food vendors in the neighborhood. Food from street vendors was often not clean enough. ‘Now, we are serving safe food for our peers. To set up this cafeteria, club members raised funds through a fundraising event. Bringing together peers, teachers, and community members, they collected enough fund to build a space and hire a community member to cook and serve the food in addition to the seed money provided by UNESCO. Milk tea, doughnuts, and some snacks are among the items being served now. As the rainy season is coming in Tanzania, students plan to set up a plastic roof to protect the cafeteria from rain. They are also looking into expanding their business into vegetable gardening. Youth club members also run weekly peer-to-peer campaigns encouraging studying and promoting a safe learning environment. Changes have taken place in school life. ‘We are happier to come to school. Violence has decreased between students, from teachers and parents because we have been empowered to speak out. And we are motived to study hard’, said a form three student (third year at lower secondary school), Ested Omary Ramadhani. ‘Club activities provide an important opportunity for students to achieve specific goals through their own initiatives’, said Amani Mbeyale, a Geography teacher mentoring the TUSEME club members. ‘From initiating an entrepreneurship project to running peer-to-peer support campaigns, girls and boys learn how to collaborate, communicate and solve problems while gaining confidence and improving their academic performance.’ Safe Space-TUSEME youth club encourages student-led activities to enhance adolescent girls' self-confidence and determination in remaining in school. The club is based on the combined concepts of Safe Space developed by UNESCO and TUSEME (Let’s Speak Out in Swahili) by Forum for African Women Educationalist. Students identify challenges in their school and discuss ways to address them. Similar initiatives were seen in other participating schools where peer support groups were created. For example, the youth club in Nyampulukano Secondary School discusses corporal punishment with teacher and parents. The Kilabela Secondary School club is piloting a school dormitory to address the long commute to school, often affecting girls’ attendance and increasing truancy in schools. Since May 2019, about 165 clubs were established in four districts of Tanzania – Sengerema, Mkoani, Ngorongoro, and Kasulu engaging more than 6,000 students as part of the UN Joint Programme project in Tanzania, Empowering Adolescent Girls and Young Women through Education. In partnership with UNFPA and UN Women, the project is supported by the Korean International Cooperation Agency (KOICA).
Mar 25, 2020 , Source: uneconews
PRADA and UNESCO postpone start of the Sea Beyond project on ocean sustainability as a precautionary measure in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Zimbabwe moves to strengthen music sector

Zimbabwe moves to strengthen music sector

Mar 24, 2020 , Source: uneconews
World Water Day 2020 in Latin America and the Caribbean

World Water Day 2020 in Latin America and the Caribbean

Presentation of the World Water Development Report 2020: “Water and climate change” Activities of the Intergovernmental Hydrological Program in Latin America and the Caribbean
Mar 22, 2020 , Source: uneconews
Message from Ms Audrey Azoulay, Director-General of UNESCO, on the occasion of World Water Day